Please direct comments and feedback to Dr. Frank Veeman, Deans of Arts and Sciences:  fveeman@mail.nwmissouri.edu 

 

This document was last revised and posted on:  rev. October 1, 2002

 

Document hyperlinks:

Introductory remarks

Rationale for General Education

The 42 credit hour General Education Curriculum

Skill Area Goals

·        Communicating

·        Higher-Order Thinking

·        Managing Information

·        Valuing

Knowledge Area Goals

·        Social & Behavior Sciences

·        Humanities & Fine Arts

·        Mathematics

·        Life & Physical Sciences

 

 

Introductory Remarks

 

This document describes Northwest Missouri State University’s 42 credit hour general education block.  Some assessment activities are embedded within specific courses and some are external to courses.  Locally developed assessments follow a process to ensure that they are properly validated.  The nationally normed Educational Testing Service Academic Profile has been identified as an external assessment device that aligns with many of our stated competencies.

 

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Northwest Missouri State University General Education Rationale Statement

 

General education is the curricular foundation at Northwest Missouri State University.  It encourages students to acquire and use the intellectual tools, knowledge, and creative capabilities necessary to study the world as it is, as it has been understood, and as it might be imagined.  It also furnishes them with skills that enable them to deepen their understanding and to communicate it to others.  Through general education, Northwest equips students for success in their specialized areas of study and for fulfilled lives as educated persons, as active citizens, and as effective contributors to their own prosperity and to the general welfare.

 

Knowledge is ever changing; therefore, general education must alert students to the connections and the potential for interaction among all branches of knowing, ordering, and imagining.  General education should inform students that the world is understood in different ways and should provide them with the means to come to terms, intelligently and humanely, with diversity.  As a result of their general education, students should acquire appropriate investigative, interpretative, and communicative competencies.

 

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The 42 credit hour General Education Curriculum

 

Northwest Missouri State University

42 credit hour General Education Curriculum

Freshman Seminar (1 cr hr)

Freshman Seminar                                  1 hour

Communicating

Written Communication (6 cr hr)

10-111 Composition (3 cr hr) AND

10-112 Composition (3 cr hr)

                  OR

10-115 Honors Composition (3 cr hr) AND

ACT credit upon successful completion of 10-115 (3 cr hr)

Oral Communication (3 cr hr)

29-102 Fundamentals of Oral Communication (3 cr hr)

Communicating                                      9 hours

Humanities and Fine Arts

Literature (3 cr hr)

10-220 Introduction to Literature (3 cr hr)

Fine Arts

Select one from the following courses (3 cr hr):

13-102 Art Appreciation

13-110 Survey of Art

19-201 Enjoyment of Music

22-262 History of Dance

43-101 Theatre Appreciation

Humanities/Philosophy

Select one from the following courses (3 cr hr):

26-102 Western Civilization I

26-103 Western Civilization II

26-104 The Humanities, The Eastern World

39-171 Introduction to Philosophy

39-274 Introduction to Ethics

29-235 Introduction to Classical Rhetoric

Humanities & Fine Arts                         9 hours

Life and Physical Sciences

Life Sciences

Select one from the following options (4 cr hr):

04-102/103 General Biology/Lab

04-112/113 General Botany/Lab

04-114/115 General Zoology/Lab

03-130 Plant Science

Physical Sciences

Select one from the following options (4 cr hr):

24-112/113 General Chemistry/Lab

24-114/115 General Chemistry I/Lab

27-110/111 General Geology/Lab

27-114/115 General Earth Science/Lab

25-110/111 General Physics I/Lab

25-112/113 General Physics II/Lab

25-120/121 Fundamentals of Classic Physics I/Lab

40-102/103 The Physical Sciences/Lab

40-122/123 Descriptive Astronomy/Lab

Life & Physical Sciences                       8 hours

Mathematics (3 credit hours minimum)

Select one from the following courses:

17-110 Finite Mathematics (4 cr hr)

17-114 General Statistics I (3 cr hr)

17-115 Concepts of Mathematics (3 cr hr)

17-117 Precalculus (4 cr hr)

17-118 College Algebra (3 cr hr)

17-120 Calculus I (4 cr hr)

17-171 Fundamentals of Mathematics (3 cr hr)

Mathematics                                           3 hours

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Government and History

34-102 Intro. to American Politics & Government (3 cr hr)

33-155 America – A Historical Survey (3 cr hr)

Behavioral Science

Select one from the following courses (3 cr hr):

08-103 General Psychology

08-303 Educational Psychology

Social Science

Select one from the following courses (3 cr hr):

35-101 General Sociology

52-130 Survey of Economics

52-150 General Economics I

03-120 Introduction to Agricultural Economics

32-101 Introduction to Geography

35-108 General Anthropology

Social & Behavioral Sciences              12 hours

 

Total                                                     42 hours

 

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General Education Reporting Matrix - Northwest Missouri State

 

State-Level Goals: Skill Areas

Communicating - To develop students' effective use of the English language and quantitative and other symbolic systems essential to their success in school and in the world. Students should be able to read and listen critically and to write and speak with thoughtfulness, clarity, coherence, and persuasiveness.

Institutional Competencies

Primary Course(s) and Credit Hours

Secondary Experiences

Associated Assessment(s)

A.      Students will analyze their own and others’ speaking and writing.

COMM 102:

·          Critique sample oral performances by assessing content, organization, and delivery.

ENG COMP 111, 112 & 115:

·          Self-evaluation and peer review of others’ writing by looking at organization, development and language.

This competency is met in the following courses:

 

 

29-102 Fund Oral Comm (3 cr)

 

 

 

 

10-111 English Composition (3 cr)

10-112 English Composition (3 cr)

10-115 Honors Composition (6 cr)

None specified at this time.

 

 

 

 

Students conduct peer evaluations of oral presentations.

 

 

Students reflect and respond to their own and their peers’ writing.

B.      Students will conceive of writing as a recursive process that involves many strategies, including generating material, evaluating sources when used, drafting, revising and editing.

ENG COMP 111, 112 & 115:

·          Generate researched writings that develop and organize a valuable central idea.

·          Use writing process to successfully invent, plan, draft, revise and edit.

This competency is met in the following courses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

10-111 English Composition (3 cr)

10-112 English Composition (3 cr)

10-115 Honors Composition (6 cr)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Library Tutorial online with a pre-test and post-test; then two-three days of library orientation on how to locate materials and how to evaluate sources for a research paper.

 

Writing Center tutoring available M-F for students.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty evaluate assignments/ writing; End-of-Core Writing Assessment at the end of the second course in the sequence, ENG 112 or 115.

C.      Students will make formal written and oral presentations employing correct diction, syntax, usage, grammar, and mechanics.

COMM 102:

·          Deliver public speeches and group presentations employing linguistic techniques appropriately and properly.

ENG COMP: 111, 112 & 115:

·          Write papers using correct diction, syntax, usage, grammar, and mechanics.

This competency is met in the following courses:

 

 

 

 

29-102 Fund Oral Comm (3 cr)

 

 

 

 

 

10-111 English Composition (3 cr)

10-112 English Composition (3 cr)

10-115 Honors Composition (6 cr)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Writing Center tutoring available M-F for students.

 

 

 

Faculty prepare written evaluations of vocal and linguistic quality in oral presentations.

 

Faculty evaluate papers using rubrics and/or written feedback on papers.  End-of-Core Writing Assessment at the end of the second course in the sequence, ENG 112 or 115.

D.      Students will focus on a purpose (e.g., explaining, problem solving, argument) and vary approaches to writing and speaking based on that purpose.

COMM 102:

·          Deliver public speeches with a specific objective in at least two genres: informative and persuasive.

ENG COMP 111, 112 & 115:

·          Write expository, persuasive, problem solving, and argument essays.

This competency is met in the following courses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

29-102 Fund Oral Comm (3 cr)

 

 

 

10-111 English Composition (3 cr)

10-112 English Composition (3 cr)

10-115 Honors Composition (6 cr)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Writing Center tutoring available M-F for students.

Faculty prepare written evaluations of thesis clarity, accuracy of information, and soundness of argumentation in oral presentations.

 

Faculty incorporate the different criteria – primary traits – of the writing assignment into the rubric and/or provide written feedback on papers.

E.       Students will respond to the needs of different venues and audiences and choose words for appropriateness and effect.

COMM 102:

·          Explicitly account for and adapt to target audiences in public speeches.

·          Display sensitivity toward and adaptation to others during interviews and interpersonal interactions.

ENG COMP 111, 112 & 115:

·          Write essays with rhetorical awareness of audience, purpose, content, genre, tone and authorial stance.

This competency is met in the following courses:

 

 

 

 

29-102 Fund Oral Comm (3 cr)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10-111 English Composition (3 cr)

10-112 English Composition (3 cr)

10-115 Honors Composition (6 cr)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Writing Center tutoring available M-F for students.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty incorporate audience adaptation into evaluation rubrics for public presentations.

 

Faculty incorporate rhetorical awareness of audience, purpose, content, genre, tone and authorial stance into evaluation of students’ work.

F.       Students will communicate effectively in groups by listening, reflecting, and responding appropriately and in context.

COMM 102:

·          Engage in formal team deliberations and presentations in problem-solving and/or developmental groups.

This competency is met in the following courses:

 

 

 

 

29-102 Fund Oral Comm (3 cr)

 

None specified at this time.

 

 

 

 

 

Formal group communication assignments include evaluation of leadership collaborative skills.

G.      Students will interpret quantitative and/or graphical models.

This competency is met in the following courses:

03-130 Plant Science (4 cr)

04-102/103 General Biology & Lab

      (4 cr)

04-112/113 General Botany & Lab

      (4 cr)

04-114/115 General Zoology & Lab

      (4 cr)

None specified at this time.

Assessment under development.

 

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General Education Reporting Matrix - Northwest Missouri State

 

State-Level Goals: Skill Areas

Higher-Order Thinking - To develop students’ ability to distinguish among opinions, facts, and inferences; to identify underlying or implicit assumptions; to make informed judgments; and to solve problems by applying evaluative standards.

Institutional Competencies

Primary Course(s) and Credit Hours

Secondary Experiences

Associated Assessment(s)

A.  Students will identify problems, construct alternative solutions recognizing the implicit and explicit assumptions made and advocate a reasoned choice after examining potential conflicts resulting from differing sets of presumptions.

This competency is met in the following courses:

Social Sciences group

 

None specified at this time.

Educational Testing Service Academic Profile.

B.  Student will reflect on and evaluate their critical-thinking processes.

This competency is met in the following courses:

Behavioral Sciences group

None specified at this time.

Educational Testing Service Academic Profile.

 

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General Education Reporting Matrix - Northwest Missouri State

 

State-Level Goals: Skill Areas

Managing Information - To develop students’ abilities to locate, organize, store, retrieve, evaluate, synthesize, and annotate information from print, electronic, and other sources in preparation for solving problems and making informed decisions.

Institutional Competencies

Primary Course(s) and Credit Hours

Secondary Experiences

Associated Assessment(s)

A.      Students will access and/or generate information from a variety of sources, including the most contemporary technological information.

·          Access periodical articles via a Web-based periodical index using basic keyword search strategies and Web pages via a search engine using a menu driven search interface.

·          Access periodical articles via a Web-based periodical index, a library catalog, and the Web using advanced keyword search strategies.

·          Access Web pages about a selected topic employing advanced search strategies within Web search engines.

This competency is met in the following courses:

29-102 Fund Oral Comm (3 cr)

 

 

 

 

None specified at this time.

 

 

Students prepare a speech on the topic that is evaluated by the instructor and/or peer-evaluated.

B.      Students will evaluate information for its currency, usefulness, truthfulness, and accuracy

·          Evaluate the authority, bias, and currency of a Web source.

·          Evaluate periodical articles, library catalog book records, and Web sources considering the validity of the author’s credentials, documentation, and appropriateness of the date (for the topic).

·          Compare and contrast scholarly and popular periodical literature.

·          Evaluate the authority, design, accuracy, purpose, and target (audience) of Web sources.

This competency is met in the following courses:

10-112 English Composition (3 cr)

10-115 Honors Composition (6 cr)

 

 

None specified at this time.

 

 

Students write a paper on the topic that is evaluated by the instructor.

C.      Students will organize, store, and retrieve information efficiently.

·          Cite a full-text periodical article retrieved from a Web-based periodical index and a Web page retrieved via a search engine.

·          Cite sources (periodical articles, books, and Web pages) retrieved from a Web-based periodical index, a library catalog, and a search engine.

·          Report analysis of the criteria (authority, design, accuracy, purpose, target) employed in evaluating Web sites.

This competency is met in the following courses:

29-102 Fund Oral Comm (3 cr)

 

 

 

 

None specified at this time.

 

 

Students prepare a speech on the topic that is evaluated by the instructor and/or peer-evaluated.

D.      Students will reorganize information for an intended purpose, such as research projects.

·          Cite an article and a Web site chosen for a specific topic.

·          Create a “Works Cited” page listing sources retrieved about a specific topic.

·          Organize full-text periodical articles within an e-mail interface using subject lines.  The subject lines help shape the thesis and argument, as well as the design of the paper or project.

·          Write a paper that includes research and a “Works Cited” page.

·          Synthesize analysis of the authority, design, accuracy, purpose, and target of several Web sources in an essay.

This competency is met in the following courses:

10-112 English Composition (3 cr)

10-115 Honors Composition (6 cr)

 

 

 

None specified at this time.

 

 

Students write a paper on the topic that is evaluated by the instructor.

E.       Students will present information clearly and concisely, using traditional and contemporary technologies.

·          Produce a hand-written synthesis of how they would use a specific Web source in their speech or presentation.

·          Use a word processor to produce a researched paper synthesizing information gleaned from research.

·          Use courseware to submit a paper evaluating five Web sources.

This competency is met in the following courses:

10-112 English Composition (3 cr)

10-115 Honors Composition (6 cr)

 

29-102 Fund Oral Comm (3 cr)

 

 

 

 

None specified at this time.

 

Students write a paper on the topic that is evaluated by the instructor.

 

Students prepare a speech on the topic that is evaluated by the instructor and/or peer-evaluated.

 

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General Education Reporting Matrix - Northwest Missouri State

 

State-Level Goals: Skill Areas

Valuing - To develop students’ abilities to understand the moral and ethical values of a diverse society and to understand that many courses of action are guided by value judgments about the way things ought to be. Students should be able to make informed decisions through identifying personal values and the values of others and through understanding how such values develop. They should be able to analyze the ethical implications of choices made on the basis of these values.

Institutional Competencies

Primary Course(s) and Credit Hours

Secondary Experiences

Associated Assessment(s)

A.      Students will recognize the values (especially moral and ethical) of a diverse society.

This competency is met in the following courses:

Freshman Seminar (1 cr)

None specified at this time.

Faculty: in course assessment

B.      Students will identify personal values and the values of others.

This competency is met in the following courses:

Freshman Seminar (1 cr)

None specified at this time.

Faculty: in course assessment

C.      Students will analyze choices based on values (especially moral and ethical).

This competency is met in the following courses:

Freshman Seminar (1 cr)

 

None specified at this time.

Faculty: in course assessment

D.      Students will analyze the implications of moral and ethical choices in a diverse society.

This competency is met in the following courses:

Freshman Seminar (1 cr)

None specified at this time.

Faculty: in course assessment

 

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General Education Reporting Matrix - Northwest Missouri State

 

State-Level Goals: Knowledge Areas

Social & Behavior Sciences - To develop students’ understanding of themselves and the world around them through study of content and the processes used by historians and social and behavioral scientists to discover, describe, explain, and predict human behavior and social systems.  Students must understand the diversities and complexities of the cultural and social world, past and present, and come to an informed sense of self and others. (Students must fulfill the state statute requirements for the United States and Missouri constitutions.)

Institutional Competencies

Primary Course(s) and Credit Hours

Secondary Experiences

Associated Assessment(s)

A.      Students will understand the foundation of human behavior.

This competency is met in the following courses:

Behavioral Science group

None specified at this time.

Educational Testing Service Academic Profile.

B.      Students will understand the structures and decision making processes which contribute to the development of human culture and society.

This competency is met in the following courses:

Social Science group

None specified at this time.

Educational Testing Service Academic Profile: Social Science subscore.

C.      Students will understand the United States and Missouri governments and constitutions.

This competency is met in the following courses:

34-102 American Government

     (3 cr)

None specified at this time.

Educational Testing Service Academic Profile.

D.      Students will draw on an understanding of American history to evaluate contemporary problems.

This competency is met in the following courses:

33-155 American History (3 cr)

None specified at this time.

Educational Testing Service Academic Profile.

 

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General Education Reporting Matrix - Northwest Missouri State

 

State-Level Goals: Knowledge Areas

Humanities & Fine Arts - To develop students’ understanding of the ways in which humans have addressed their condition through imaginative work in the humanities and fine arts; to deepen their understanding of how that imaginative process is informed and limited by social, cultural, linguistic, and historical circumstances; and to appreciate the world of the creative imagination as a form of knowledge.

Institutional Competencies

Primary Course(s) and Credit Hours

Secondary Experiences

Associated Assessment(s)

A.  Students will demonstrate the ability to describe the scope and variety of works in the fine arts.

This competency is met in the following courses:

Fine Arts group

None specified at this time.

Under development.

B.  Students will demonstrate the ability to explain the historical, cultural, social, intellectual, linguistic and/or ethical dimensions of the humanities.

This competency is met in the following courses:

Humanities/Philosophy group

 

None specified at this time.

Under development.

C.  Students will demonstrate the ability to identify the formal elements which inform critical analysis, interpretation and judgment of works in the fine arts.

This competency is met in the following courses:

Fine Arts group

None specified at this time.

Under development.

D. Students will demonstrate the ability to recognize cultural diversity in the historical, cultural, social, intellectual, linguistic and/or ethical dimensions of the humanities.

This competency is met in the following courses:

Humanities/Philosophy group

None specified at this time.

Under development.

E. Students will demonstrate the ability to articulate a response based upon formal standards to works in the humanistic studies.

This competency is met in the following courses:

10-220 Intro to Literature (3 cr)

 

None specified at this time.

Under development.

 

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General Education Reporting Matrix - Northwest Missouri State

 

State-Level Goals: Knowledge Areas

Mathematics - To develop students’ understanding of fundamental mathematical concepts and their applications. Students should develop a level of quantitative literacy that would enable them to make decisions and solve problems and which could serve as a basis for continued learning. (The mathematics requirement for general education should have the same prerequisite(s) and level of rigor as college algebra.)

Institutional Competencies

Primary Course(s) and Credit Hours

Secondary Experiences

Associated Assessment(s)

A.  Students will apply appropriate analytic, geometric and/or statistical skills.

This competency is met in the following courses:

Mathematics group

None specified at this time.

Educational Testing Service Academic Profile:

Mathematics norm-

     referenced score   

Mathematics criterion-

     referenced score

B.  Students will use formula, data analysis, information, events, and/or graphic representation to make decisions or solve other problems with numerical answers.

This competency is met in the following courses:

Mathematics group

None specified at this time.

Educational Testing Service Academic Profile:

Mathematics norm-

     referenced score   

Mathematics criterion-

     referenced score

 

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General Education Reporting Matrix - Northwest Missouri State

 

State-Level Goals: Knowledge Areas

Life & Physical Sciences - To develop students’ understanding of the principles and laboratory procedures of life and physical sciences and to cultivate their abilities to apply the empirical methods of scientific inquiry. Students should understand how scientific discovery changes theoretical views of the world, informs our imaginations, and shapes human history. Students should also understand that science is shaped by historical and social contexts.

Institutional Competencies

Primary Course(s) and Credit Hours

Secondary Experiences

Associated Assessment(s)

A.  Students will evaluate scientific conclusions, explanations, and models using logic, evidence, and supporting data.

This competency is met in the following courses:

Physical Sciences group

 

None specified at this time.

Under development.

B.  Students will utilize learned knowledge to make informed decisions.

This competency is met in the following courses:

Life Sciences group

None specified at this time.

Under development.

C.  Students will interpret experimental and/or raw scientific data.

This competency is met in the following courses:

Physical Sciences group

None specified at this time.

Under development.

D.  Students will identify the impact of science and technology on society.

This competency is met in the following courses:

Life Sciences group

None specified at this time.

Under development.

E.  Students will describe the concepts of the nature, organization, and evolution of living systems.  

This competency is met in the following courses:

Life Sciences group

 

None specified at this time.

Under development.

F.  Students will describe the basic principles of the physical universe.

This competency is met in the following courses:

Physical Sciences group

None specified at this time.

Under development.

 

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COMMUNICATIONS/THEATRE ARTS

29-102 Fundamentals Oral Communication

 

Communication Competency

 

A.                 Students will analyze their own and others' speaking and writing.

C.            Students will make formal written and oral presentations employing correct

diction, syntax, usage, grammar, and mechanics.

D.            Students will focus on a purpose (e.g. explaining, problem solving, argument) and

vary approaches to writing and speaking based upon that purpose.

E.             Students will respond to the needs of different venues and audiences and choose

words for appropriateness and effect.

 

Competencies A, C, D, and E are evaluated as part of our assessment of the two major public speeches. Our evaluation rubrics are attached.  These templates (point values will vary depending on the assignment) are based on the Competent Communicator evaluation rubric developed by the National Communication Association. We will be conducting reliability tests at least once annually with these instruments, which will be adjusted accordingly. All instructors will use the same template.  [Link to informative rubric] [Link to persuasive rubric] 

 

F.             Students will communicate effectively in groups by listening, reflecting, and

             responding appropriately and in context.

 

For competency F, we are in the process of refining our group project rubric for implementation in Fall 2002. Attached is a draft, which provides you with an idea of where that project is heading. We will be conducting the same reliability tests with this rubric as with our public speaking assessments. All instructors will use the same template.  [Link to group project rubric] [Link to group project grade definitions]

 

Managing Information

 

A.                 Students will access and/or generate information from a variety of sources,

including the most contemporary technological information.

C.              Students will organize, store, and retrieve information efficiently.

E.                  Students will present information clearly and concisely, using traditional and

contemporary technologies.

 

Competencies A and C are met using the Library Research Skills multimedia tutorial developed in collaboration with Owens Library.  That tutorial is located at:

http://www.nwmissouri.edu/library/courses/communication/INDIANA/SCUBA/BLITZHOME.HTM

To assess student learning from this module, we will be administering pre-tests and post-tests co-developed with the Owens Library staff.  The multimedia tutorial includes internal mastery learning components that allow the student to advance in the tutorial only after giving the correct response to several questions.  Competency E is assessed within the public speaking rubrics within the Presentational Aid section.  At least one speech requires the use of a presentational aid.

 

 

 

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29-102 GRADING FORM: INFORMATIVE PRESENTATION

revised 02/20/03

Name____________________________________ Section__________ Date____________

_____INTRODUCTION (5-15 points)


Gets attention  - / OK / +

States thesis   - / OK / +

Topic relevant to audience  - / OK / +

Establishes credibility - / OK / +

Previews main points - / OK / +

Orients audience - / OK / +


 

 

                ________________________________________________________________________________________

_____ORGANIZATION (10-25 points)


Outline prepared as instructed - / OK / +

Defines key terms - / OK / +

Uses logical development - / OK / +

Uses internal previews & summaries used - / OK / +

Labels main ideas - / OK / +

Develops points sufficiently  - / OK / +

Makes smooth transitions between points  - / OK / +

Gives clear purpose for each main idea  - / OK / +

Covers main points in proper proportion  - / OK / +

Relates all main points to thesis  - / OK / +


 

 

                ________________________________________________________________________________________

______REASONING AND EVIDENCE (10-25 points)


Supports opinions with evidence  - / OK / +

Cites sufficient number of sources (minimum 3)

#1

#2

#3

Variety of supporting material  - / OK / +

 

Uses quality evidence:

Qualified  - / OK / +

Objective  - / OK / +

Recent  - / OK / +

Adapts ideas & evidence to audience  - / OK / +

Avoids serious inaccuracies  - / OK / +

 


 

                ________________________________________________________________________________________

_____PRESENTATIONAL AID(S) (0-10 points)


Handled smoothly  - / OK / +

Integrated into presentation  - / OK / +

Comprehensible to audience  - / OK / +

Illustrate key ideas  - / OK / +


 

 

                ________________________________________________________________________________________

______VOICE AND LANGUAGE (5-15 points)


Enthusiasm  - / OK / +

Concise, appropriate wording  - / OK / +

Proper grammar & pronunciation  - / OK / +

Volume  - / OK / +

Vocal variety  - / OK / +

Rate (speed) slow / OK / fast

Extemporaneous  - / OK / +


 

 

                ________________________________________________________________________________________

______PHYSICAL DELIVERY (5-15 points)


Eye contact with audience  - / OK / +

Facial expressions  - / OK / +

Body movements & gestures  - / OK / +

Posture  - / OK / +


 

 

                ________________________________________________________________________________________

______CONCLUSION (5-15 points)


Signals ending  - / OK / +

Reviews main points  - / OK / +

Emphasizes impact of speech  - / OK / +

Challenges or calls audience to action  - / OK / +

Establishes closure  - / OK / +


 

 

Points earned: ______ (100 possible)  Letter grade: ______                Penalties: -______  Reason:

 

 

 

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29-102 GRADING FORM: PERSUASIVE PRESENTATION

revised 02/20/03

Name____________________________________ Section__________ Date____________

_____INTRODUCTION (5-15 points)


Gets attention  - / OK / +

States thesis   - / OK / +

Topic relevant to audience  - / OK / +

Establishes credibility - / OK / +

Previews main points - / OK / +

Orients audience - / OK / +


 

 

                ________________________________________________________________________________________

_____ORGANIZATION (10-25 points)


Outline prepared as instructed - / OK / +

Defines key terms - / OK / +

Uses logical development - / OK / +

Uses internal previews & summaries used - / OK / +

Labels main ideas - / OK / +

Develops points sufficiently  - / OK / +

Makes smooth transitions between points  - / OK / +

Gives clear purpose for each main idea  - / OK / +

Covers main points in proper proportion  - / OK / +

Relates all main points to thesis  - / OK / +


 

 

                ________________________________________________________________________________________

______REASONING AND EVIDENCE (10-25 points)


Supports opinions with evidence  - / OK / +

Cites sufficient number of sources (minimum 3)

#1

#2

#3

Variety of supporting material  - / OK / +

Specifies and qualifies claims  - / OK / +

 

Uses quality evidence:

Qualified  - / OK / +

Objective  - / OK / +

Recent  - / OK / +

Adapts ideas & evidence to audience  - / OK / +

Avoids serious logical flaws  - / OK / +

Refutes opposing arguments  - / OK / +

 


 

                ________________________________________________________________________________________

_____PRESENTATIONAL AID(S) (0-10 points)


Handled smoothly  - / OK / +

Integrated into presentation  - / OK / +

Comprehensible to audience  - / OK / +

Illustrate key ideas  - / OK / +


 

 

                ________________________________________________________________________________________

______VOICE AND LANGUAGE (5-15 points)


Enthusiasm  - / OK / +

Concise, appropriate wording  - / OK / +

Proper grammar & pronunciation  - / OK / +

Volume  - / OK / +

Vocal variety  - / OK / +

Rate (speed) slow / OK / fast

Extemporaneous  - / OK / +


 

 

                ________________________________________________________________________________________

______PHYSICAL DELIVERY (5-15 points)


Eye contact with audience  - / OK / +

Facial expressions  - / OK / +

Body movements & gestures  - / OK / +

Posture  - / OK / +


 

 

                ________________________________________________________________________________________

______CONCLUSION (5-15 points)


Signals ending  - / OK / +

Reviews main points  - / OK / +

Emphasizes impact of speech  - / OK / +

Challenges or calls audience to action  - / OK / +

Establishes closure  - / OK / +


 

 

Points earned: ______ (100 possible)  Letter grade: ______                Penalties: -______  Reason:

 

 

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29-102 Grading Form For Group Problem-Solving

Name:                                                                                                                        Section:

                _______________________________________________________________________________

_____ Define & analyze problem (15 points)

Problem considered thoroughly, not restated from assignment

History of problem

Identification of stakeholders (who is affected)

Extent of problem (duration, harms)

Time frame for solution

                _______________________________________________________________________________

_____            Establish criteria for evaluating solutions (15 points)

Budget, time, or other constraints

Resources & personnel available

Responsibility for implementation

Impartial, objective criteria (not just hunches or personal preferences)

                _______________________________________________________________________________

_____            Identify possible solutions (15 points)

Several diverse solutions

Feasible solutions

Original solutions

                _______________________________________________________________________________

_____            Evaluate solutions (15 points)

Advantages & disadvantages weighed for each possible solution

Short-term & long-term effects considered

Tangible (money, hardware, etc.) & intangible (time, money) costs & benefits recognized

Precedents for success or failure of similar solutions

All relevant stakeholders considered

                _______________________________________________________________________________

_____ Select best solutions (15 points)

Clear decision-making method

Minority or dissenting views acknowledged

Combined or revised solutions considered

Selection tied to criteria

                _______________________________________________________________________________

_____            Establish methods to test solutions (15 points)

Stakeholder reactions

Specific standards for success & failure

Contingency plans

Method to monitor solutions

Frequency for monitoring solutions

_______________________________________________________________________________

_____    Group Discussion Board Postings (20 points)

Made frequent, positive contributions

Assumed healthy task and maintenance roles

Avoided aggression, blocking, recognition-seeking, dominating

Stayed on task and topic

Avoided groupthink

                _______________________________________________________________________________

_____    Oral Report (30 points)

Thoroughly explores the problem-solving step(s)

Details why and how decisions were reached at each step

Specifies actual research conducted

Verbal fluency, proper grammar

Smooth, professional delivery

                _______________________________________________________________________________

_____ points (140 possible)                Letter Grade Equivalent _____

 

-_____ penalties                Reason:

 

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Group Problem Solving

Grading Criteria

 

A

projects will have the following characteristics:

 

 

·        Problem stated clearly. Underlying problems such as conflict of values, rights or interests are identified.  Problem placed in historical or other developmental context.

·        Four or more solutions proposed.

·        Feasibility of solutions proven by researching similar or analogous solutions that have been implemented.

·        Anticipated consequences or outcomes are identified as desirable or undesirable for four or more proposed solutions.

·        A clear outline plan made, listing any resources needed, to implement a solution.  Measures are given by which outcomes can be determined and evaluated to reach a conclusion about the adequacy of the solution to the problem.   

 

B

  projects will have the following characteristics:

 

 

·        Problem stated clearly. Underlying problems such as conflict of values, rights or interests are identified.

·        Two or three solutions proposed.

·        Feasibility of solutions explained with reasoning.

·        Outcomes identified and evaluated for 2 or 3 solutions.

·        The plan and measures are adequate to make a conclusion.

 

C

 projects will have the following characteristics:

 

 

·        Problem(s) identified adequately.

·        One solution proposed.

·        Feasibility of solution not considered or asserted.

·        Consequences unclear as to their desirability.

·        Components of plan or measures are ambiguous.

 

D

 projects will have the following characteristics:

 

 

·        Problem and/or underlying issues poorly stated.

·        Solutions are not clearly connected to the problem.

·        Outcomes not connected to the proposed solution.

·        Significant information is missing from either the plan, or method of measuring consequences, to make a conclusion.

 

F

 projects will have the following characteristics:

 

 

·        Problem not identified or its underlying issues missing.

·        Solutions do not address the problem or underlying issues.

·        Outcomes missing.

·        The plan or measures used are not connected or missing.

 

 

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Adequate

 

In general the writer demonstrates a consistent understanding of, but has not completely mastered, the skills necessary to produce an academic research paper.

 

Thesis

There is a discernable, if general, thesis that suggests an understanding of the purpose of the research project and an understanding of an appropriate audience.

 

Development

The paper’s development might be somewhat uneven and might sometimes shows logical leaps, but more than not it presents appropriate evidence and explanations using the student’s own words and accurately cited quotations drawn from research sources; paragraphs show overall cohesion but may stray from a single topic sentence.

 

Organization

The paper should demonstrate a mastery of the fundamentals of paragraphing and organization and should be free of any confusing passages.

 

Language

The paper should present a clear understanding of the academic expectations for Standard Written English and should be virtually free of grammatical and mechanical errors, including spelling and punctuation errors.

 

Documentation

In-text and bibliographic citations follow MLA style rules, without significant inconsistencies.

 

 

 

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Freshman Seminar Valuing Component

Faculty Information Sheet

Purpose
This project is driven by the CBHE’s requirement of having Valuing as part of the General Education Program at all Missouri Institutions. GEDAG (General Education Advisory Group, a sub-committee of the Senate’s Curriculum Committee) decided to have this competency fulfilled in Freshman Seminar, a decision subsequently approved by the Faculty Senate.   A Valuing Team, under the guidance of the Freshman Seminar Staff, was assembled during the summer and a pilot program was constructed.

 

Delivery Choices
It was decided by GEDAG that this component be constructed for online delivery for a variety of reasons among which was the desire to minimize the impact on the teaching staff.  We were fully aware of the historical problem of ‘dumping’ new things into Freshman Seminar, and see the Values Component as core principle of unity to the course. The decision was made to utilize eCompanion (rather than CourseInfo) given Northwest’s transition to that delivery system for all in-house course delivery needs.  The decision to do this on-line was first developed in GEDAG and approved by that committee and subsequent authoritative bodies. The online modules can offer consistent content while minimizing the preparation demands on the instructional staff.

 

Goals of Value Component
After much discussion on content and style of the valuing material, the Valuing Team decided on the following:

1)      the valuing component would have academic credibility

2)      the valuing component would integrate the academic aspects with the entirety of the living-learning experience.

 

Structure of Value Component
Given these goals, the value component consists of two parts: a) didactic and b) application/practical.  Thus, the ten units of the valuing component of freshman seminar are divided into these two parts.   The first five are didactic in character and introduce the student to the study of values.   The second five are application scenarios.

 

The Didactic Part
The didactic part consists of the following:

Unit I: Introduction to Values

Unit II: Classification of Values

Unit III: Formal Classification of Values

Unit IV: Critically Thinking about Values

Unit V: Values and Northwest

Each of these units will have similar structure in terms of the material presented.

 


Unit I: Introduction to Values
Purpose: The purpose of this unit is to introduce the student to the issue of values.  The scope includes questions about the multiplicity of values at play in a complex culture, and to Axiology, the study of values.  The underlying goal is to inculcate in the student an appreciation of the importance of rationally thinking or critically thinking about values.

 

Content:

A)    A Tegrity (PowerPoint with narrating video) presentation concerning the unit and the information provided in the unit;

B)     Student Video: (two possible viewing formats) Two students are discussing the recent admission of one of them to Northwest, and the confusion of values that he is experiencing.  Themes discussed:

a.      What are values

b.      Where do they come from

c.      Why they are sometimes in conflict

d.      Why rationally thinking or critically thinking about values is important

e.      Axiology – the science of values

f.        The meaning of ‘science’ as rational inquiry; and its connection to university

g.      How different sciences utilize different rules or criteria

h.      The key criteria for doing ‘rational discourse,’ doing ‘science’

                                                               i.      Consistency, coherency, adequacy, applicability, communicability;

                                                             ii.      Rules for evidence, rules for truth-finding

i.        The difference between knowledge and opinion and the role of the university as a place where we seek knowledge;

j.        Axiology as the science of values, now understood in light of the criteria

C)    Tegrity Review: These key elements are then highlighted in a review; the PowerPoint becomes a tool to reinforce the key concepts.

D)    Threaded Discussions – some threaded discussion topics have been provided; these TD’s can be used in classroom discussions or on-line;

E)     Assessment: An objective assessment package is provided. Freshman seminar instructors can adapt it to their own use by adding questions, deleting questions, etc.  Since this is done totally online, there is no actual grading by the instructor or by the peer advisor.

 

Key Concepts:

This unit attempts to facilitate a conversation about values, and how one of the chief tasks of the university centers on values.   One of the underlying myths that it tries to explode is that ‘science’ is value neutral.  Not only can there be a science of values, every science operates within a value framework.   Science is not just about facts that we memorize, but also about ideas and concepts that are valued.   The second myth is that “it’s just all a matter of opinion.”  Using classic distinctions between knowledge and opinion, the rational project of a science becomes the tool by which these two cousins (knowledge and opinion) can be sorted out.  A primary task of university is to assist the student understand how we distinguish between knowledge claims and opinions.  Thus, the science of Axiology becomes understood as the rational conversation about values (the science of values).  The third myth that the unit begins to tackle is the classic fact-value distinction, which is often formulated as “science is just about facts, and values judgments are formulated elsewhere.”  The unit lays the foundation for understanding that value judgments are involved in all rational inquiry. Academic disciplines are not value-neutral, and the critically thinking student should be asking questions about the underlying values in each course they take.


Unit II: Classification of Values
Purpose: The purpose of this unit is to informally introduce the student to the organization of values: first, by grouping them according to various sources: family, peers, society, religion, etc.  The varieties of sources can give rise to conflicts in values and the resultant need for a rational discourse concerning values.  The student is introduced to the problem of relativism of values, and the search for universal values.
 

Content:

A)    A Tegrity (PowerPoint with narrating video) presentation concerning the unit and the information provided in the unit;

B)     Student Video: (two possible viewing formats) Two students are discussing a movie that presented value issues.  Themes discussed:

a.      Continuation of source of values from previous video

b.      Family, peer, societal, etc. values are discussed

c.      Why they are sometimes in conflict

d.      Relativism of values: ‘All values are in the eye of the beholder’

e.      The search for universal values and its connection to the project of the university

f.        How the search for universal returns to rational inquiry about values - Axiology

C)    Tegrity Review: These keep elements are then highlighted in a review; the PowerPoint becomes a tool to reinforce the key concepts.

D)    Threaded Discussions – some threaded discussion topics have been provided; these TD’s can be used in classroom discussions or on-line;

E)     Assessment: An objective assessment package is provided. Freshman seminar instructors can adapt it to their own use by adding questions, deleting questions, etc.  Since this is done totally online, there is no actual grading by the instructor or by the peer advisor.

 

Key Concepts:

This unit attempts to facilitate a conversation about the source of values.  Do all families value the same things?  Should all families value the same things?  How do certain peer originating values come into conflict with family originating values, and so forth?  The key myth that is being addressed here is ‘Everyone’s values should be like mine.’  Or, ‘if someone else’s values are different from mine, theirs are wrong.’  This diversity of values immediately raises the possibility that all values are relative---merely dependent upon the individual or social group.  The student is then introduced to the classic problem---which has become a dominant cultural perspective today: ‘Everything is relative.’  Using ethical/moral examples, the student is introduced to the importance of ‘escaping relativism.’  Again rational inquiry into values becomes the door by which the quest for universal values is perused.  If relativism is to be overcome (if it can be), then participation in the rational discourse about values is the only way short of dogmatisms.  Again the university is a place where that rational discourse (science) is fostered.  It is important that the student recognize that a universal value is not one that in fact everyone assents to, but is ideally one to which all rational persons would assent, if they understood the meaning of the value. 


Unit III: Formal Classification of Values
Purpose: The purpose of this unit is to expand on the classification process of the last video, but now in a more technical manner.  It is recommended that the student read the textbook chapter on values.  Using classic terminology, values are classified into epistemic, ethical, and aesthetic values.  Each of these are, in turn, explored in light of the issue of relativism of values---and how the task of the university is involved with the search for universal values.  This is followed by additional distinctions between intrinsic and instrumental values and performance values.

 

Content:

A)    A Tegrity (PowerPoint with narrating video) presentation concerning the unit and the information provided in the unit;

B)     Student Video: (two possible viewing formats) Three students, one of which is currently enrolled in Freshman Seminar, are discussing the various classifications of values.  Themes discussed:

a.      Epistemic Values – knowledge and opinion, truth and falsity

b.      The role of science and epistemic values and why certain beliefs may not fit into a particular science

c.      The difference between regional epistemic values and universal epistemic values

d.      Ethical values – the important distinction between mores, moral values and ethical values

e.      The role of the science of ethics in the rational discourse about moral values

f.        Aesthetic values – judgments about beauty, ugliness

g.      The role of the science of Aesthetics in determining universals

h.      Intrinsic vs. instrumental values; ends and means, and the ethical principle that ends do not justify the means.

i.        Performance values – evaluation of how achieves particular value-goals

C)    Tegrity Review: These keep elements are then highlighted in a review; the PowerPoint becomes a tool to reinforce the key concepts.

D)    Threaded Discussions – some threaded discussion topics have been provided; these TD’s can be used in classroom discussions or on-line;

E)     Assessment: An objective assessment package is provided. Freshman seminar instructors can adapt it to their own use by adding questions, deleting questions, etc.  Since this is done totally online, there is no actual grading by the instructor or by the peer advisor.

 

Key Concepts:

This unit is a keystone in the unity of values, linking ‘the true’ (epistemic), ‘the good’ (ethical), and ‘the beautiful’ (aesthetic).  These three arenas highlight the fundamental values of the academic aspect of university life---the search for the true, the good and the beautiful. Each arena addresses the problem of relativism.  For example, why is it that certain valued beliefs that arise from religious communities do not qualify as epistemic values in the science of biology?  Or: why is it that my moral beliefs, or those of my group, might not be ethically binding on all persons? Or:  how can my art teacher make judgment about my art, is not ‘beauty in the eye of the beholder?’  The underlying theme is to help the student realize that the academic project of the university is to rise above their own personal or regional judgments about what is true, good and beautiful and participate in a university conversation about universal values.  This is then followed by the distinction between intrinsic and instrumental values (means and ends).  The fundamental question becomes ‘are the people and things in my world merely means (instruments) for my own valued ends?’


Unit IV: Critically Thinking about Values
Purpose: Given the varieties of values that envelop a person, it becomes important to grasp certain tools to analyze these values---to critically think about values.  Critically thinking about values is essential to making rational choices about values.  This unit exposes the student to the basics of critical thinking. Since the overarching goal is critically thinking about values, the student is first introduced to the distinction between normative and descriptive sciences.  This becomes essential to understand this critical distinction between types of values.  The normative sciences attempt to elucidate values that are universalizable. The descriptive sciences attempt to articulate modes of explanation about things.  In the process of critically thinking about values, one must distinguish between values that lay normative claim on a rational person from those that are descriptive of some state of affairs.

 

Content:

A)    A Tegrity (PowerPoint with narrating video) presentation concerning the unit and the information provided in the unit;

B)     Student Video: (two possible viewing formats) Three students are discussing the course related material that presented value issues.  Themes discussed:

a.      Normative vs. Descriptive Science ---the difference between “what is the case” and “what ought to be the case”

b.      The traditional importance of ethical values and the principle of supercession of values; when values are in conflict, how one value may supersede over another value;

c.      Difference between thinking and critically thinking

d.      Critically thinking and analysis of presuppositions and consequences

C)    Tegrity Review: These keep elements are then highlighted in a review; the PowerPoint becomes a tool to reinforce the key concepts.

D)    Threaded Discussions – some threaded discussion topics have been provided; these TD’s can be used in classroom discussions or on-line;

E)     Assessment: An objective assessment package is provided. Freshman seminar instructors can adapt it to their own use by adding questions, deleting questions, etc.  Since this is done totally online, there is no actual grading by the instructor or by the peer advisor.

 

Key Concepts:

This unit begins to prepare the student for the critical evaluation of the applications in Part II of the values component.  All values are not equal (again the relativism theme challenged).  Some values have their origin in personal preferences; some values have a more universal character.  For example, there is no obligation for me to like ‘eating a big Mac.’  However, there may be an epistemic obligation to believe that 2+2=4, if I am a rational person who understands the meaning of “2+2=4.”  In a similar fashion, ethical values are those that have normative obligation and which have a rationally higher status than non-ethical values.  The trick here is to get the students to realize that there may not be a definite list of ethical values, but that what is important is participating in the rational discourse about moral values.  It is in participating in this rational discourse that the discernment about values, the critically thinking about values takes place.   It is in this context then that the exploration of the presuppositions and consequences of the values one holds occurs.  The critical thinker about values (the critical thinker about anything) explores the “hidden values” that lie behind a given value, as well as the outcomes of the value.   Going back to a theme in Unit One, all of one’s values have impact on our behavior and on our various other beliefs and values.  The critical thinker explores those presuppositions and consequences.

Unit V: Values and Northwest
Purpose: Beginning the transition to the more practical dimensions, the fundamental values of Northwest, of a university, are explored.  Building on the previous concepts the student is reminded that Northwest is a community and the life-blood of a community is communication.  As a university community, Northwest is concerned with ‘verging towards unity’ (the meaning of university, universal).  This ‘verging towards unity’ is articulated in to key ways: the unity of integral personhood or formation of holistic character, and unity of disciplines and pursuit of “the true, the good, the beautiful.” 

 

Content:

A)    A Tegrity (PowerPoint with narrating video) presentation concerning the unit and the information provided in the unit;

B)     Student Video: (two possible viewing formats) Three students are discussing the course related material that presented value issues.  Themes discussed:

a.      Community and Communication: to fortify together

b.      Living-learning environment---holistic approach

c.      The metaphor of university as ‘temple of learning’ rather than a ‘marketplace’

d.      Key values:

                                                               i.      Civility of discourse

                                                             ii.      Respect for Facility

                                                            iii.      Contribution to Community

                                                           iv.      Know Thyself

e.      Unity of Knowledge – General Education as Core

f.        The Freshman Seminar Covenant

C)    Tegrity Review: These keep elements are then highlighted in a review; the PowerPoint becomes a tool to reinforce the key concepts.

D)    Threaded Discussions – some threaded discussion topics have been provided; these TD’s can be used in classroom discussions or on-line;

E)     Assessment: An objective assessment package is provided. Freshman seminar instructors can adapt it to their own use by adding questions, deleting questions, etc.  Since this is done totally online, there is no actual grading by the instructor or by the peer advisor.

 

Key Concepts:

Integration, connections, community, communication, unity.  The various aspects of life at Northwest form an integrated whole.  The underlying concept is that Northwest is a community of persons engaged in mutual character formation---hence the essential role of communication and fostering communication.  The Covenant becomes the sign of commitment by all parties to that community.

 

 

The Application/Practical Part

General Comment: In each of the application videos, some aspect of student life is captured on video, usually in the format of students discussing their behavior or the behavior of their peers.  The ultimate task here will be for the students to apply distinctions and thought processes from the didactic component to these scenarios.

 

The application/practical part consist of the following:

Application I: Relationships

Application II: Alcohol

Application III: Cultural Diversity

Application IV: Plagiarism

Application V: Sexual Orientation

Each of these units will have similar structure in terms of the material presented.

Application I: Relationships

Purpose: To facilitate a critical value analysis concerning relationships.  The various characters articulate multiple values.  Some value “cheap sex”, others “meaningful relationships.”  What is the value of each?  What are the presuppositions of the characters, what are the consequences of their values?  Are there epistemic, ethical/moral, aesthetic values articulated?  Intrinsic, instrumental, performance values?  How does one go about critically deciding about values of this type?  How do the values of the characters related to the values of Northwest?

 

Content:

A)    A Tegrity (PowerPoint with narrating video) presentation concerning the unit and the information provided in the unit;

B)     Student Video: (two possible viewing formats) Two groups of three students are discussing the previous evenings party and a one-night stand that occurred. 

C)    Threaded Discussions – some threaded discussion topics have been provided; these TD’s can be used in classroom discussions or on-line;

D)    Assessment: A short answer assessment package is provided. Freshman seminar instructors can adapt it to their own use by adding questions, deleting questions, etc.  Since these are short answers, the committee decided that the peer advisor using a provided testing key could assess these answers.

 

Key Concepts:

Identification of values; examination of various values as to their presuppositions and consequences.  No attempt is made to suggest which character ‘has the right values.’  Is ‘having cheap sex’ something that people value? Absolutely.  Is ‘having committed relationships’ something that people value? Absolutely.  The task is to encourage the students to critically think about those values.  Why would a person have this value or that value?  This posture is adopted throughout.

Application II: Alcohol

Purpose: To facilitate a critical value analysis concerning alcohol.  We find our characters in various stages of alcohol usage.  The various characters articulate multiple values.  Some value “the bottle is my only friend”, others “staying sober.”  What is the value of each?  What are the presuppositions of the characters? What are the consequences of their values? Are there epistemic, ethical/moral, aesthetic values articulated? Intrinsic, instrumental, performance values?  How does one go about critically deciding about values of this type?  How do the values of the characters related to the values of Northwest?

 

Content:

A)    A Tegrity (PowerPoint with narrating video) presentation concerning the unit and the information provided in the unit;

B)     Student Video: (two possible viewing formats) Six friends at a party after a full evening of drinking; this video runs sequentially backwards to earlier parts of the day

C)    Threaded Discussions – some threaded discussion topics have been provided; these TD’s can be used in classroom discussions or on-line;

D)    Assessment: A short answer assessment package is provided. Freshman seminar instructors can adapt it to their own use by adding questions, deleting questions, etc.  Since these are short answers, the committee decided that the assessment of these answers could be made by the peer advisor using a provided testing key.

 

Key Concepts:

Identification of values; examination of various values as to their presuppositions and consequences.

 

Application III: Cultural Diversity

Purpose: To facilitate a critical value analysis concerning cultural values and diversity.  We find our characters engaged in a conversation about cultural identity---being an American.  One character brings home two new international friends and discussions follow about cultural differences.

 

Content:

A)    A Tegrity (PowerPoint with narrating video) presentation concerning the unit and the information provided in the unit;

B)     Student Video: (two possible viewing formats) Three friends and two international students;

C)    Threaded Discussions – some threaded discussion topics have been provided; these TD’s can be used in classroom discussions or on-line;

D)    Assessment: A short answer assessment package is provided. Freshman seminar instructors can adapt it to their own use by adding questions, deleting questions, etc.  Since these are short answers, the committee decided that the peer advisor using a provided testing key could make the assessment of these answers.

 

Key Concepts:

Identification of values; examination of various values as to their presuppositions and consequences

 

Application IV: Academic Honesty

Purpose: To facilitate a critical value analysis concerning academic honesty and honor violations.  We find our characters engaged in the production of group assignment and find the opportunity to copy a work written by someone else.  A conversation about academic honesty ensues.

Content:

A)    A Tegrity (PowerPoint with narrating video) presentation concerning the unit and the information provided in the unit;

B)     Student Video: (two possible viewing formats) Four friends working on a group project;

C)    Threaded Discussions – some threaded discussion topics have been provided; these TD’s can be used in classroom discussions or on-line;

D)    Assessment: A short answer assessment package is provided. Freshman seminar instructors can adapt it to their own use by adding questions, deleting questions, etc. Since these are short answers, the committee decided that the assessment of these answers could be made by the peer advisor using a provided testing key.

 

Key Concepts:

Identification of values; examination of various values as to their presuppositions and consequences

 

Application V: Sexual Orientation

Purpose: To facilitate a critical value analysis concerning sexual orientation and differences.  This video is a montage of internal dialogues by our six characters, reflecting on sexual orientation issues and relationships.   They explore various feelings and perspectives on these issues.

Content:

A)    A Tegrity (PowerPoint with narrating video) presentation concerning the unit and the information provided in the unit;

B)     Student Video: (two possible viewing formats) Three friends and two international students;

C)    Threaded Discussions – some threaded discussion topics have been provided; these TD’s can be used in classroom discussions or on-line;

E)     Assessment: A short answer assessment package is provided. Freshman seminar instructors can adapt it to their own use by adding questions, deleting questions, etc.  Since these are short answers, the committee decided that the peer advisor using a provided testing key could make the assessment of these answers.

 

Key Concepts:

Identification of values; examination of various values as to their presuppositions and consequences

 

Summative Observation:  The entire values component for Freshman Seminar is get the student to realize that values are surrounding us in all aspects of our life.  The key to learning how to navigate in this sometimes-overwhelming sea of values is actively participating in the rational discourse about values.   In other words: Keep the Conversation Going.   This is what university is all about.

 

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